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Thursday, July 21, 2011

Back to the Basics

I hope my readers will enjoy Rabbi Eli Mansour's Divrei Torah during the three weeks. This was pointed out to me by a reader (thank you!) and it was published in Community Magazine.

The conclusion of his column emphasizing personal responsibility, seeing the consequences of ones actions, and being happy with our lots is below as a taste. Head on over to Community Magazine to read the entire piece. I always enjoy Rabbi Mansour's Torah and thank my reader for pointing this out to me.


Some people might find it strange that a rabbi would emphasize specifically this issue as we enter the period of mourning for the hurban. It has become expected to hear about loftier subjects such as loving our fellow Jew, avoiding lashon hara (negative speech about people), prayer, modesty and Torah study. Undoubtedly, we should try to improve ourselves in all areas of religious observance, and the aforementioned topics, and so many others, are integral to this endeavor. But every so often, it is worthwhile to go back to the basics. The road to holiness begins with a basic sense of responsibility and discipline. Though the road certainly does not end there, that must be our point of departure. From there, we will hopefully continue to grow and improve, and become worthy of the long-awaited return of the divine presence to the Jewish nation, speedily and in our days, amen. [Emphasis mine].

10 comments:

Observer said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
sima said...

Thank you for drawing my attention to this excellent and relevant article.

Observer said...

What a superb article. It reminds me why I continue to read your blog, despite many comments that are either lo nogea to me or are at worst, inappropriat.

I recently made the decision not to visit Israel (it's been 40 years since I was there in university) in order to put the money saved for Israel in my retirement fund. To foresee the future does not always mean buying a less expensive cut of meat. Sometimes it means foregoing one's heart's desire so one can live a life of dignity in later years. That was my choice.

[deleted]

People have very mixed up ideas of priorities.

Orthonomics said...

Edited one comment.

Mark said...

Excellent article! Everyone should read it.

Shabbat Shalom Umevorach to all!

rosie said...

I had never seen Community Magazine and I really gained a lot from the article. I went to a shiur the other day and the rabbi was talking about the posuk in Ashrei where we say that we are satisfied with what Hashem opens His Hand to give us. He mentioned that a person should not go into debt to make Shabbos, even if it means eating the same food that the person eats during the week.

Recycle Aluminum said...

When I see city streets littered with countless items that should have been thrown in trash cans or recycled, I wonder how America could possibly hope to be the greatest nation in the world.

Anonymous said...

Ever see the food left over by many frum people when eating out? It's just disgraceful!!

Mordechai Y. Scher said...

Rav Mansour's video presentation for 9 Av (Chofetz Chaim Heritage Foundation) emphasized that one improves their lot, and the world's, not through s'gulot and charms; but through working on improving and advancing our relations with those around us. His emphasis on avoiding s'gulot was repeated and remarkable.

Orthonomics said...

Beautiful. Now I wished I attended. Rabbi Mansour is a virtual Rabbi of mine.